Mormon Leaders Call for New Medical-Marijuana Plan in Months

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Gary Herbert, a Republican, said it's too early to gather lawmakers to consider an alternative to the ballot measure. Last month the church made a rare public statement against it. There's an urgency to accomplish this," said Jack Gerard, a leader in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.The church has argued the ballot measure would allow too many people to get medical cannabis cards without sufficient safeguards against doctors "rubber stamping" access.But Utah Gov. AdvertisementSupported byMormon Leaders Call for New Medical-Marijuana Plan in MonthsBy The Associated PressSept. 17, 2018SALT LAKE CITY — Mormon church leaders are calling for Utah lawmakers to pass medical-marijuana legislation by the end of the year even as they urge people to vote against a ballot measure that would legalize medical marijuana in the state.Church leaders say they oppose the ballot measure because they believe it could allow recreational users get marijuana in Utah if it passes in November, but they still want patients with serious medical needs to have access, the Deseret News reported Sunday."This isn't 'let's wait till next year to have a conversation.' It needs to be dealt with soon. Herbert typically calls a special session only when there is a "near consensus" among state lawmakers and there's a long way to go to reach one on medical marijuana, spokesman Paul Edwards said.Herbert has said he will vote against the ballot initiative known as Proposition 2, but he wants lawmakers to act next year.Democratic lawmaker Brian King, on the other hand, said he's voting for Proposition 2 even though he thinks it's flawed.

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Mormon Leaders Call for New Medical-Marijuana Plan in Months

By The Associated Press

Sept. 17, 2018

SALT LAKE CITY — Mormon church leaders are calling for Utah lawmakers to pass medical-marijuana legislation by the end of the year even as they urge people to vote against a ballot measure that would legalize medical marijuana in the state.

Church leaders say they oppose the ballot measure because they believe it could allow recreational users get marijuana in Utah if it passes in November, but they still want patients with serious medical needs to have access, the Deseret News reported Sunday.

"This isn't 'let's wait till next year to have a conversation.' It needs to be dealt with soon. There's an urgency to accomplish this," said Jack Gerard, a leader in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

The church has argued the ballot measure would allow too many people to get medical cannabis cards without sufficient...

Read the full article @ NY Times