NORML Endorses SQ 788: Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Access Initiative

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Summary

Under the plan, licensed medical marijuana patients may cultivate up to six mature plants, and may possess personal use quantities of marijuana flower, edibles, or infused concentrates. Between now and June 26, representatives with the Vote Yes On 788 campaign will be traveling statewide and meeting face-to-face with voters. Individuals possessing a medical marijuana license would be authorized to consume marijuana and possess up to three ounces, six mature and six seedling marijuana plants, up to one ounce of concentrated marijuana, up to 72 ounces of edible marijuana, and up to eight ounces of marijuana in their residences. Under this initiative, employers, landlords, and schools are forbidden from penalizing persons for holding a medical marijuana license, unless failing to do so causes a loss of benefits under federal law or the license-holders possess or use marijuana while at work. However, possessing up to 1.5 ounces of marijuana without a license but with a medical condition would be deemed a misdemeanor.

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Oklahoma City: The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) is proud to endorse Oklahoma’s State Question 788 — a statewide ballot measure that provides patients regulated access to medical cannabis. SQ 788 is a patient-centric plan that empowers physicians to use their discretion when determining their patient’s ideal health care plan.

Oklahomans will go to vote on the measure on June 26.

“We’re excited to offer NORML’s support to the Vote Yes On 788 campaign,” said NORML Outreach Director Kevin Mahmalji. “Together, we will build a broad-based coalition to ensure that lawmakers do not unduly interfere with the bonafide doctor-patient relationship, and that patients are no longer subject to arrest for accessing or growing this important medicine.”

State Question 788 also establishes a licensed system of medical cannabis distribution.

“State Question 788 was designed...

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