Ohio Won’t Hit Sept. 8 Deadline for Medical Marijuana

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"You almost have to wonder if the state was taking its cue from Mel Brooks, purposely sabotaging (the program) from the outset, knowing that the Kasich administration doesn't really want medical marijuana to work in Ohio. He said he's again pushing a so-called "Fresh Start Act," which calls for purging non-violent marijuana crimes that are now legal from offenders' records. He said that ballot issue has a "fatal flaw" that his lawyers believe would open the resulting marijuana market up to widespread abuse.James also wants to see state lawmakers act. The firm also is moving into insurance, pet products and beverages, he said.James said his plans to pursue another constitutional amendment legalizing marijuana for personal use, which would likely appear on the 2020 ballot, haven't been dampened by a competing proposal. AdvertisementSupported byOhio Won't Hit Sept. 8 Deadline for Medical MarijuanaBy The Associated PressJune 5, 2018COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio said Tuesday that it will not have medical marijuana available by the September deadline, even as a key backer of recreational marijuana legalization said he's using a combination of strategies to continue expanding access to safe cannabis.Several cultivators who were close to ramping up operations experienced inspection delays that now make it impossible to meet the date set by Ohio's 2016 medical marijuana law, Department of Commerce policy adviser Mark Hamlin said."We know that the public expectation and patient expectation around Sept. 8 was significant, so that was really important to us to try to hit because we know that people have been counting on that date," he said.

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Ohio Won't Hit Sept. 8 Deadline for Medical Marijuana

By The Associated Press

June 5, 2018

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio said Tuesday that it will not have medical marijuana available by the September deadline, even as a key backer of recreational marijuana legalization said he's using a combination of strategies to continue expanding access to safe cannabis.

Several cultivators who were close to ramping up operations experienced inspection delays that now make it impossible to meet the date set by Ohio's 2016 medical marijuana law, Department of Commerce policy adviser Mark Hamlin said.

"We know that the public expectation and patient expectation around Sept. 8 was significant, so that was really important to us to try to hit because we know that people have been counting on that date," he said. "We don't take lightly that the product is not going to be available on that date."

Hamlin contended that the state is not technically...

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