Oregon’s Medical Marijuana Program Admits to Problems

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AdvertisementSupported byOregon's Medical Marijuana Program Admits to ProblemsBy The Associated PressJuly 12, 2018SALEM, Ore. — How much medical marijuana is in the pipeline in Oregon? That month, there were 172; by December 2017 there were only 19 as many medical marijuana businesses switched over to the recreational side, which is regulated by the Liquor Control Commission. They asked the health authority to provide a list of medical marijuana grow sites, but the agency refused, saying the law doesn't permit it to provide such a list. Medical marijuana processing sites dropped from 106 to 12 over the same period.The medical marijuana program lacks reliable, independent tools to validate grow site locations and relies on inconsistent county databases, the report said.Deschutes County District Attorney John Hummel commended Allen for commissioning the study.___Follow Andrew Selsky on Twitter at https://twitter.com/andrewselsky .Find complete AP marijuana coverage here: https://apnews.com/tag/LegalMarijuanaAdvertisement The managers of the state's program concede that they simply don't know because of lax reporting by producers and a lack of site inspectors.That, they say, creates opportunities for marijuana to be diverted into the lucrative black market, something that federal authorities have long complained about.Oregon was one of the first states to legalize medical marijuana in 1998, and in 2014 voters approved allowing recreational use.

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Oregon's Medical Marijuana Program Admits to Problems

By The Associated Press

July 12, 2018

SALEM, Ore. — How much medical marijuana is in the pipeline in Oregon? The managers of the state's program concede that they simply don't know because of lax reporting by producers and a lack of site inspectors.

That, they say, creates opportunities for marijuana to be diverted into the lucrative black market, something that federal authorities have long complained about.

Oregon was one of the first states to legalize medical marijuana in 1998, and in 2014 voters approved allowing recreational use. The state's struggle to transform a business that for decades had operated illegally in the shadows into a regulated industry sets an example for other states moving toward legalization.

In an internal review released late Thursday, the state's Health Authority, which oversees the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, admitted it has...

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