Crime boss or champion of the poor? Pot activist awaits sentencing

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Summary

When the police ordered the business to stop selling cannabis, Craig said the response was to offer rolled marijuana joints in return for food and other donations. Helping crime victims with funeral expenses was just one of the ways that Lucier was giving back to the community, she told the court. To make purchases at Compassion House, Craig told Justice Mark Hornblower, customers had to fill out membership forms attesting to being 19 and older. Lucier “never intended to profit from the business,” she added, with proceeds going towards helping community organizations and those in need. Was Windsor pot activist Leo Lucier the “head of a sophisticated criminal operation” or a compassionate Windsorite selling cannabis to those suffering pain while also raising funds to help the poor in his community?

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Was Windsor pot activist Leo Lucier the “head of a sophisticated criminal operation” or a compassionate Windsorite selling cannabis to those suffering pain while also raising funds to help the poor in his community?

Those were the two sides presented by the prosecution and the defence to an Ontario Court judge who must now determine a fitting sentence after Lucier, 51, was found guilty of setting up a business that illegally, and openly, sold the mind-altering weed.

As a result of Lucier entering a guilty plea in August, the federal prosecutor on Friday asked the judge to withdraw the same Cannabis Act charges that had been laid...

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