URI Ph.D. candidate researches effects of cannabis and alcohol co-use, wins prestigious NIH F31 Award

1w
2m read
Summary

Researchers typically define “protective behavioral strategies” as harm reduction tactics that individuals employ when using alcohol or cannabis, such as allocating a designated driver, periodically drinking water, etc. Press Release KINGSTON, R.I. — April 16, 2024 — Psychology Ph.D. candidate Sabrina Todaro will measure the degree to which adults 18 to 25 are using “protective behavioral strategies” when engaging in both alcohol and cannabis. Todaro joins the recent success URI’s Department of Psychology has had in obtaining these prestigious awards. The level of combined usage is observably higher for college students, who are more likely to engage in cannabis and alcohol than any other substances, said Todaro, who is using multi-level modeling to analyze the data. Because co-use is common among young adults, Todaro stressed the importance of funding research that examines harm reduction approaches, such as PBS. She hypothesizes there is a lower use of PBS on co-use occasions relative to single-use occasions, despite the risk of increased consequences from co-use.

Article Preview

Press Release

KINGSTON, R.I. — April 16, 2024 — Psychology Ph.D. candidate Sabrina Todaro will measure the degree to which adults 18 to 25 are using “protective behavioral strategies” when engaging in both alcohol and cannabis. Her study, funded by an F31 grant from the National Institutes of Health, aims to assess the use of protective behavioral strategies on days when co-use occurs relative to days when only alcohol or cannabis is used, and how that may be related to the level of use and consequences experienced.

Researchers typically define “protective behavioral strategies” as harm reduction tactics that individuals...

Read the full article @ Cannabis Law Report